DRC seeks experiences of culturally and linguistically diverse people with disability in Australia

Tags Royal Commission

Posted 1 month ago

The Royal Commission encourages responses to its latest issues paper by 11 June 2021.[Source: Disability Royal Commission]
The Royal Commission encourages responses to its latest issues paper by 11 June 2021.[Source: Disability Royal Commission]

The Disability Royal Commission wants to hear about challenges, barriers and ways to better prevent and reduce violence against, and abuse, neglect and exploitation of, culturally and linguistically diverse people with disability.

In its latest issues paper released this week, the Royal Commission calls for information and feedback from members of the public, particularly people with disability from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and their supporters about:

  • The attitudes and understanding of disability within culturally and linguistically diverse communities

  • The experiences of people with disability from such communities

  • How the Royal Commission can move towards the goal of a more inclusive society

Previous reports presented to the Royal Commission have found that people with disability from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are ‘often stigmatised and isolated because of attitudes and misconceptions in their own communities’.  This can be heightened by attitudes towards disability and cultural and linguistic diversity held by the broader community.

Examples include the interactions between people with disability and systems and services such as education, health (GPs, hospitals, community health services, mental health services, specialists and dentists), immigration, justice (courts, prisons, police), transport, workplaces, group homes and other accommodation arrangements, and the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). 

It also includes their relationships with those around them and their participation in the community.

The Royal Commission uses the term ‘culturally and linguistically diverse’ to reflect a diverse range of people from different backgrounds. Its definition includes:

  • People born in a country where English is not the main spoken language, as well as those who have a cultural heritage different from the dominant Australian culture.

  • Migrants and refugees (including asylum seekers) who identify as being from a culturally and linguistically diverse background. This includes those who recently arrived and those who have lived in Australia for some time.

  • People born in Australia who identify as being from a culturally and linguistically diverse background, even where their families have been here for several generations.

The Royal Commission says it recognises that people who are deaf or hearing impaired and who use Auslan or another sign language as their first language share a distinct, rich culture and language.  

Some members of the Deaf community identify as being culturally and linguistically diverse.

The Royal Commission is seeking feedback in the following areas:

  • How culture and language may affect the life course of someone with a disability from a culturally and linguistically diverse background.

  • How culturally and linguistically diverse people with a disability overcome language barriers when trying to access support, and the pathways they follow to ask for assistance.

  • Cultural attitudes and the language of disability within culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

  • How communities can have positive or protective attitudes towards disability, and reasons that people may not identify as having a disability even though they have an impairment.

  • How the different ways disability is understood in culturally and linguistically diverse communities may support and include people with disability, or how they might exclude or disadvantage them.

Responses can be in writing, an audio recording or a video recording. Responses can be in any language. The Royal Commission will translate the response to English.

The Royal Commission encourages responses by 11 June 2021. Responses will also be accepted after this date. This issues paper has been translated into nine languages. 

You can read the full issues paper and how to respond on the Royal Commission website here.