Labor Government announces investment into intellectual disability specialised care

Posted 4 months ago by Nicole Pope

If elected the Labor Government will make specialist care more available to people with intellectual disability [Source: Shutterstock]
If elected the Labor Government will make specialist care more available to people with intellectual disability [Source: Shutterstock]

The Labor Government has announced an investment to make specialist care more available to people with intellectual disability if they become the elected party.

The investment of $9.5 million will benefit over 400,000 Australians with intellectual disability through tailored health care.

The Government will partner with the Council for Intellectual Disability and Inclusion Australia for three years to help train GPs, other health care providers, as well as medical and nursing schools on the needs of people with intellectual disability.

This will involve placing intellectual disability health workers in Primary Health Networks and developing, trialing and evaluating a ‘toolkit’ on intellectual disability health care.

Inclusion Australia took to Twitter to commend the announcement made by Shadow Minister of Health and Medicare, Catherine King.

“Great commitment. Our members around Australia all applaud this major announcement.”

Chief Executive Officer of Australian Federation of Disability Organisations Ross Joyce also shares his support.

“Great news from @CatherineKingMP announcing that @AustralianLabor will invest $9.5m to improve health care for Australians with Intellectual Disability #ID. Great work @nswcid #OurHealthCounts @inclusionoz.”

The Royal Australasian College of Physicians welcomes the funding investment.

“We welcome Labor's $9.5m commitment to the health of people with an intellectual disability. This is an important first step in building the skills and capacity of healthcare workers to effectively treat patients with intellectual disability.”

Australians with intellectual disability have higher rates of physical and mental health conditions, and twice the rate of emergency department presentations and hospital admissions, with an estimated 38 percent of deaths deemed avoidable.

The investment aims to help current and emerging health professionals understand the needs of people with intellectual disability over a three year period.

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