NDIS seeks feedback on COVID-19 changes from participants

Tags NDIS Accessibility Research

Posted 1 week ago by Rebecca St Clair

“We hope the research will allow us to draw valuable insights from the NDIS community, on what worked well and what could have been done better. (Source: iStock)
“We hope the research will allow us to draw valuable insights from the NDIS community, on what worked well and what could have been done better. (Source: iStock)

The National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) and the University of Melbourne have launched a new survey seeking feedback from National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participants on the changes made to supports during COVID-19.

As a part of their COVID-19 response, the NDIS introduced a number of changes in March to help ensure participants could still receive support during the pandemic.

Changes made included the extension of NDIS plans by up to 24 months, shifting meetings online, and the introduction of a 10 percent COVID-19 loading on some supports. 

Some of these temporary measures are set to end by 1 July, but many of them will continue to offer support to participants.  

A survey is currently available on the NDIS website until August and NDIA spokesperson Shannon Rees, encourages participants to complete the online survey. 

The NDIA now wants to hear from participants, families and carers about their experiences during COVID-19 with:

  • Interacting with the NDIA

  • Using telehealth to access allied health services and;

  • Accessing NDIS funded services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented challenges for all Australians and Ms Rees says that understanding the experiences of people with disability during this time offers valuable insights. 

“This anonymous survey gives participants, their families and carers a chance to share participants’ experiences of interacting with the Agency and the Scheme during this period.

“Particularly, the feedback will give us valuable insight into how participants have found changes such as using telehealth to access their supports as well as helping the Agency to make future decisions, for example, on the use of phone or video for planning meetings.”

Chief Researcher Professor Kim Bennell from the University of Melbourne’s Department of Physiotherapy says that the University will independently analyse the experiences of participants regarding planning, monitoring and delivery of services.

“We hope the research will allow us to draw valuable insights from the NDIS community, on what worked well and what could have been done better during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

The research is funded by the Melbourne Disability Institute at the University of Melbourne and the NDIA. 

The survey is designed to capture the experience of NDIS participants however, family, carers, and support workers can fill in the survey on behalf of an NDIS participant. 

The survey, which is expected to take 15 to 20 minutes to complete, is available on the NDIS website.

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