Report shows LGBTI people with disability experience higher rates of discrimination

Posted 2 months ago by Nicole Pope

Key findings of the review found higher rates of discrimination and reduced service access among LGBTI people with disability compared to LGBTI people without disability [Source: Shutterstock]
Key findings of the review found higher rates of discrimination and reduced service access among LGBTI people with disability compared to LGBTI people without disability [Source: Shutterstock]

A new report released by La Trobe University has revealed the discrimination experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people living with disability.

Written by William Leonard and Dr Rosemary Mann and funded by the Gay and Lesbian Foundation of Australia (GALFA), The everyday experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people living with disability paints a modern day picture of the challenges LGBTI people with disability face everyday.

Key findings of the review found higher rates of discrimination and reduced service access among LGBTI people with disability compared to LGBTI people without disability.

It also revealed a greater restriction on freedom of sexual expression, particularly for LGBTI people with intellectual disability and reduced social support and connection from both LGBTI and disability communities.

Lead author and Director of Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria (GLHV) at Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, Mr Leonard hopes the report will provide positive outcomes for LGBTI people with disability.

“I hope the findings will be used to develop evidence-based health research, policy and programs that reflect the lives of LGBTI people with disability.”

He says to do this, LGBTI people with disability must be involved in not only the design and development of programs, but also the research, while addressing what is common to this group and what is different.

“This includes the different needs of people with intersex variations, of trans and gender diverse people and of bisexual people but also of LGBTI people who are part of other minority populations, including Aboriginal, multicultural, multi-faith and rural LGBTI people with disability.”

Mr Leonard says the topic was important to research as it highlights the broader discrimination and social exclusion faced by LGBTI people with disability.

“The review clearly shows that current research, policy and programs are not addressing let alone meeting the diverse needs of LGBTI people with disability.”

He explains the key takeaway of the report is the need to address the causes and effects of systematic discrimination to improve the health and wellbeing and services provided by LGBTI people with disability.

The project took 12 months to complete.

To read the full report, click here.

For more information on disability support and services, please visit DisabilitySupportGuide.com.au

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